Saved Money by Having Your Accountant or CPA Draft Corporate Legal Documents?

You wouldn’t go to your dentist for your taxes or your doctor to paint your house, right?  So why allow your accountant or CPA to draft critically important legal documents for your business?

Recently a number of clients seeking my help to fix problems and solve disputes have uttered the statement, “well, my accountant drafted that document for me”.  When non-lawyers try to prepare important legal documents for business, the business owner cannot go back to the accountant or CPA to fix the disaster because they lack the competence to do so.  It is actually a third-degree felony in Florida to practice law without a license, not to mention the fact that it upsets real lawyers because those people can cause a great deal of harm.  So, for those accountants and CPAs thinking you are doing someone a favor preparing contracts, bylaws, shareholder agreements, operating agreements, and the like . . . beware.

Accountants and CPAs have special training and experience in financial matters and taxes, not in business law.  Business lawyers do that and Florida Bar Board Certified business litigators are the only recognized experts in the field.  Florida’s business laws change and update in response to an ever changing commerical landscape.  It is a full time job for lawyers to keep on top of these laws.  Accountants and CPAs plainly are not qualified to prepare important legal documents under these laws.  For example, as of January 1, 2015, we have new limited liability company laws in Florida that apply to all LLCs regardless of how old they are.  Would an accountant or CPA know what changed and why?

Setting up or forming a business in Florida is relatively easy on sunbiz.org.  But, determining which corporate entity offered under Florida law is most appropriate is something to discuss with a business lawyer.  You also discuss the tax implications with your accountant or CPA, but the analysis is different.  By the way, there is no such thing as an “S Corp” as a corporate entity.  That is a tax election as compared to a “C Corp” or other choices, like sole proprietor and partnership, as to how you are treated for tax purposes.

The recognized corporate entities under Florida law are: (i) a corporation, regulated by Chapter 607 and identified by “Inc.”, (ii) a limited liability company, formerly governed by Chapter 608 and now by Chapter 605 and identified appropriately by “LLC” after the name, and (iii) a partnership, which is regulated by Chapter 617 and can have several identifiers depending on what kind of partnership it is.  For reasons your accountant or CPA can’t explain to you, the LLC is now the most common form of corporate entity used in Florida.

Depending on the circumstances of each business, it might need or be best served by having certain documents that govern its operations and internal structures.  These are commonly called “corporate governance documents”.  A corporation has bylaws and shareholder agreements.  LLCs have operating agreements, and partnerships, of course, have partnership agreements.  There are certain laws that apply to each and some of these can be bent and some can be changed.  However, an accountant or CPA that doesn’t have a license to practice law in Florida is not the right person to prepare those, just as the young person in the fast food drive-thru window probably isn’t the right person to prepare your taxes or give you tax advice, right?!

So what about contracts, non-competes, non-disclosures, and other important and useful business documents?  Yes, when not serving time for the felony, your accountant or CPA is the perfect person to prepare those for you and they can also run 60 mph and lift heavy objects as if they were a pen! Folks, don’t ask your accountant or CPA to break the law and prepare these legal business documents.  Get a good and experienced business lawyer and ask that person.  Florida has laws that impact all of these documents and lawyers, not accountants, CPAs, or anyone else, are responsible for knowing those laws and preparing documents that properly use those laws and don’t violate them.

What Are Your Document and Data Preservation Obligations?

Our world is becoming increasingly digital.  Businesses are keeping more and more information in electronic format, which highlights the question of what must a business operating in Florida keep and what can it delete in the context of a civil lawsuit.

The simple answer of keep everything may not be practical or efficient.  Sure, storage media is cheap, but storing everything also means someone at a law firm has to look through it, which can translate in enormous electronic discovery costs in litigation; we’ll get to that in a minute.

Not long ago, Florida adopted procedural rules in civil cases (contract suits, car accidents, divorces, etc.) that were modeled largely on existing Federal Rules.  Our Florida Rules require that parties perserve relevant data when served with a lawsuit or receive reasonable notice to keep data, whichever is earlier.  So, for example, if your business isn’t suing or being sued, you can freely clean out your hard drive, but you might want to consult with counsel first or archive data just to be sure.  You can still delete data if you are involved in a suit, just not data relevant to that dispute.  If you do, bad things can happen called sanctions for spoliation of evidence.

So then, what’s the easy solution? Have a data management plan and preservation policy and follow it.  If you do, you are in the safe harbor of the Florida Rules.  What do you put in that Plan?  That’s something a Board Certified expert in business litigation with experience with electronic discovery should craft for you.

Now, what is electronic discovery you asked? It is the process of obtaining and processing relevant data by and between parties in a civil lawsuit.  More simply, it’s getting your e-mails and stuff in a lawsuit.  It takes the old process lawyers used of gathering all the documents and exchanging them in a case and brings it into the 21st Century.  It recognizes that businesses and people have a lot of data and it makes efficient use of technology to process that data.  But, someone still has to look through a certain amount of that data and that’s what increases your costs.

In e-discovery as it is called, there are two large costs; the software and the lawyers who use it.  The software cost depends on the vendor and there are about a thousand of them.  Some charge for upload of data and for use.  So, the more data you have to upload and store, the more expensive it is and that’s why storing everything isn’t always the best answer.  The attorneys’ fees naturally depend on the billing arrangement with the law firm, but at the end of the day, someone has to look through some part of that data.  So, the less data there is, the less time it takes, and the less it costs.  Getting the picture?

So, in sum, storing all data for a business isn’t necessarily the best solution as doing so may inadvertently cause future e-discovery expenses to balloon in any lawsuit.  In Florida’s State Courts, businesses now have a legal obligation to preserve electronic data when demanded (with limits) or when sued, whichever comes first.  The intelligent reaction for any business or business owner is to have a proper data management plan and preservation policy for the business in place now to reduce e-discovery costs and exposure to liability later.  For that, look to one of the 240 Board Certified business litigation experts in Florida who can guide you through this developing area of e-discovery.

What Are Interrogatories, Requests to Produce, and Admissions?

What Are Interrogatories, Requests to Produce, and Admissions?

In civil lawsuits, the parties obtain and exchange information in a process called “discovery”.  This is very different from criminal cases where the police investigate and the prosecutor brings a case based on that evidence and has to disclose it to the defense.  In civil cases, the proponent of an allegation has the obligation to devleop the evidence to prove that allegation and obtains it through the process of discovery.

Discovery in civil disputes takes on two basic forms; what lawyers call “paper discovery”, and the “other stuff”.  Paper discovery actually isn’t paper anymore, but it is the series of requests provided for by our Florida procedural rules that includes interrogatories, requests to produce, and requests for admissions.  The “other stuff” is discovery aside from these requests, such as depositions and inspections of property or equipment.

Interrogatories

Interrogatories are only exchanged between the actual parties in a lawsuit, i.e. plaintiff and defendant.  They essentially are just written questions to the other.  They are limited in number, but Judges usually allow more if there is good reason.  A party’s lawyer will normally draft the answers with the party and they are sworn to under oath.

Requests to Produce

Requests to produce ask for documents or categories of documents, including electronic documents and data.  In addition to being directed at the other party in a suit, in a slightly different form, they can also be used to non-parties so they don’t have to appear at a deposition just to deliver documents.  Unlike interrogatories, these are not limited, but your lawyer will first assess whether there are objections to the requests and what should be produced.  Because these are regularly used in lawsuits, this is why parties can not now just delete data or throw away computers or devices when they are served with a lawsuit or litigation hold notice.

Requests for Admissions

Requests for admissions, like interrogatories, only go between the parties.  They ask a party to admit or deny some specific fact so it doesn’t have to be proven later.  Again, these are to be answered with your attorney as they have far-reaching implications in a case.  Admitting a fact admits it for all purposes, but wrongfully denying a fact carries consequences as well.  Therefore, the best person to assess these requests with you is obviously your attorney.

Timing of Discovery

Sometimes these discovery requests will come with the lawsuit.  In such scenario, you want to be sure to provide those to your attorney and let him or her know that you received those with the suit.  For certain requests, admissions for example, failure to timely respond can actually admit the requests so you don’t want to leave your attorney in the dark and think those requests don’t matter.

There is no right or wrong time to employ these discovery requests either.  Sometimes they are done at the beginning of the suit, sometimes toward the end, sometimes they are used several times in different phases of discovery and sometimes they are even coupled with other discovery mechanisms like depositions.

The Takeaway

The takeaway is that parties in a civil lawsuit use discovery to gather evidence to prove their case and the Florida Rules of Civil Procedure dictate what discovery mechanisms are available.  Therefore, someone who intimately knows those Rules should be in your corner drafting and responding to discovery requests.  Going it along is not a good idea and you know what they say about those who represent themselves. . .

About the Author

A Board Certified expert in business litigation by the Florida Bar, David Steinfeld, Esq. is the owner of the Law Office of David Steinfeld in Palm Beach Gardens – http://www.thepalmbeachbusinesslawyer.com.  As a member of the Association of Certified E-Discovery Specialists, Mr. Steinfeld keeps on top of e-discovery developments and also teaches Judges, lawyers, and paralegals how to perform e-discovery.  He is AV-Preeminent rated by Martindale-Hubbell, 10.0-Superb rated by AVVO, and was highlighted as “One to Watch” for 2014 by Attorney-at-Law Magazine.  He has been named one of Florida’s Legal Elite for 2012, 2013 and 2015, recognized as one of the top business lawyers in Florida by The Legal Network for 2013, 2014, and 2015, and was selected for inclusion in the list of Florida Super Lawyers for 2014 and 2015.

Mr. Steinfeld is the incoming Vice Chair of the Florida Bar Board Certification Committee for business litigation and is the current Chair of the Palm Beach County Bar’s Business Litigation CLE Committee.  He is also a member of the Board of Directors of the North County Section of the Palm Beach Bar and was appointed by the Florida Supreme Court to its Committee on Business and Contract Jury Instructions.  He is an invited Fellow in the Litigation Counsel of America and a full Professor of Law at Dankook University Law School in South, Korea.  Informative videos and articles are available for free at thepalmbeachbusinesslawyer.com.

The Law Office of David Steinfeld –

E-mail: info@davidsteinfeld.com

Tel: (561) 316-7905

What To Do If You Get A Litigation Hold Notice?

Run !  Kidding.  First thing you should do is contact counsel.  A litigation hold notice is something new in Florida.  It basically says, hey, I might sue you so don’t press that delete button on your computer.  The notice can’t say keep everything indefinitely; it has to be useful and as specific as is reasonably possible.  The purpose is to put people and businesses on notice that data, which is very easy to delete or destroy, might be needed in a dispute.  The downside to ignoring such notice can be very severe.

Litigation holds developed in the past decade or so in Federal practice as more businesses transitioned to electronic data from paper.  Because electronic data is capable of destruction or deletion, the legal industry developed a response that fairly placed parties on notice to keep certain data.  That, of course, doesn’t prevent the recipient of the notice from asking the provider to pay for the storage or to even be more specific in terms of what is to be kept.

By their nature, lawsuits are adversarial processes, but in the world of electronic discovery or “e-discovery” as it has come to be known, professional cooperation among lawyers is mandatory.  Thus, responding to a notice and implimenting and managing a litigation hold is best left to qualified and experienced counsel who can navigate your business through the hazards on the road of e-discovery.

But, what happens if you disregard a litigation hold notice or don’t properly impliment a hold?  The other side screams spoliation as it is called and the Judge has to hold a hearing or even series of hearings to evaluate whether spoliation actually occurred, the impact of it, and an appropriate sanction as a response.  Sanctions for intentional spoliation are naturally more severe that those for inadvertent destruction.  Sanctions are not limited and can range from adverse instructions to a jury telling them at the beginning of the case what one party did, to monetary punishment, to making the wrongdoer pay for recovery of the data, to restricting the wrongdoer’s ability to argue and put on evidence, to defaulting the offending party in certain circumstances.  Basically, failure to act on a litigation hold can result in lots of costs and fees and some form of punishment that can all be avoided by speaking to counsel early in the process to assess the notice and define responsive actions.

About the Author

A Board Certified expert in business litigation by the Florida Bar, David Steinfeld, Esq. is the owner of the Law Office of David Steinfeld in Palm Beach Gardens – davidsteinfeld.com.  As a member of the Association of Certified E-Discovery Specialists, Mr. Steinfeld keeps on top of e-discovery developments.  He also teaches Judges, lawyers, and paralegals how to perform e-discovery in CLE courses.  He is AV-Preeminent rated by Martindale-Hubbell, 10.0-Superb rated by AVVO, and was highlighted as “One to Watch” for 2014 by Attorney-at-Law Magazine.  He has been named one of Florida’s Legal Elite for 2012, 2013 and 2015, recognized as one of the top business lawyers in Florida by The Legal Network for 2013, 2014, and 2015, and was selected for inclusion in the list of Florida Super Lawyers for 2014 and 2015.

Mr. Steinfeld is the incoming Vice Chair of the Florida Bar Board Certification Committee for business litigation and is the current Chair of the Palm Beach County Bar’s Business Litigation CLE Committee.  He is also a member of the Board of Directors of the North County Section of the Palm Beach Bar and was also appointed by the Florida Supreme Court to its Committee on Business and Contract Jury Instructions.  He is an invited Fellow in the Litigation Counsel of America and a full Professor of Law at Dankook University Law School in South, Korea.  Informative videos and articles are available for free at davidsteinfeld.com.

The Law Office of David Steinfeld – E-mail: info@davidsteinfeld.com     Tel: (561) 316-7905.

What Are Your Document and Data Preservation Obligations?

Our world is becoming increasingly digital.  Businesses are keeping more and more information in electronic format, which highlights the question of what must a business operating in Florida keep and what can it delete in the context of a civil lawsuit.

The simple answer of keep everything may not be practical or efficient.  Sure, storage media is cheap, but storing everything also means someone at a law firm has to look through it, which can translate in enormous electronic discovery costs in litigation; we’ll get to that in a minute.

Not long ago, Florida adopted procedural rules in civil cases (contract suits, car accidents, divorces, etc.) that were modeled largely on existing Federal Rules.  Our Florida Rules require that parties perserve relevant data when served with a lawsuit or receive reasonable notice to keep data, whichever is earlier.  So, for example, if your business isn’t suing or being sued, you can freely clean out your hard drive, but you might want to consult with counsel first or archive data just to be sure.  You can still delete data if you are involved in a suit, just not data relevant to that dispute.  If you do, bad things can happen called sanctions for spoliation of evidence.

So then, what’s the easy solution? Have a data management plan and preservation policy and follow it.  If you do, you are in the safe harbor of the Florida Rules.  What do you put in that Plan?  That’s something a Board Certified expert in business litigation with experience with electronic discovery should craft for you.

Now, what is electronic discovery you asked? It is the process of obtaining and processing relevant data by and between parties in a civil lawsuit.  More simply, it’s getting your e-mails and stuff in a lawsuit.  It takes the old process lawyers used of gathering all the documents and exchanging them in a case and brings it into the 21st Century.  It recognizes that businesses and people have a lot of data and it makes efficient use of technology to process that data.  But, someone still has to look through a certain amount of that data and that’s what increases your costs.

In e-discovery as it is called, there are two large costs; the software and the lawyers who use it.  The software cost depends on the vendor and there are about a thousand of them.  Some charge for upload of data and for use.  So, the more data you have to upload and store, the more expensive it is and that’s why storing everything isn’t always the best answer.  The attorneys’ fees naturally depend on the billing arrangement with the law firm, but at the end of the day, someone has to look through some part of that data.  So, the less data there is, the less time it takes, and the less it costs.  Getting the picture?

So, in sum, storing all data for a business isn’t necessarily the best solution as doing so may inadvertently cause future e-discovery expenses to balloon in any lawsuit.  In Florida’s State Courts, businesses now have a legal obligation to preserve electronic data when demanded (with limits) or when sued, whichever comes first.  The intelligent reaction for any business or business owner is to have a proper data management plan and preservation policy for the business in place now to reduce e-discovery costs and exposure to liability later.  For that, look to one of the 240 Board Certified business litigation experts in Florida who can guide you through this developing area of e-discovery.

About the Author

A Board Certified expert in business litigation by the Florida Bar, David Steinfeld, Esq. is the owner of the Law Office of David Steinfeld in Palm Beach Gardens – davidsteinfeld.com.  As a member of the Association of Certified E-Discovery Specialists, Mr. Steinfeld keeps on top of e-discovery developments.  He also teaches Judges, lawyers, and paralegals how to perform e-discovery for Everything e-Discovery, LLC eveythinge-discovery.com.  He is AV-Preeminent rated by Martindale-Hubbell, 10.0-Superb rated by AVVO, and was highlighted as “One to Watch” for 2014 by Attorney-at-Law Magazine.  He has been named one of Florida’s Legal Elite for 2012, 2013 and 2015, recognized as one of the top business lawyers in Florida by The Legal Network for 2013, 2014, and 2015, and was selected for inclusion in the list of Florida Super Lawyers for 2014 and 2015.

Mr. Steinfeld is the incoming Vice Chair of the Florida Bar Board Certification Committee for business litigation and is the current Chair of the Palm Beach County Bar’s Business Litigation CLE Committee.  He is also a member of the Board of Directors of the North County Section of the Palm Beach Bar and was appointed by the Florida Supreme Court to its Committee on Business and Contract Jury Instructions.  He is an invited Fellow in the Litigation Counsel of America and a full Professor of Law at Dankook University Law School in South, Korea.  Informative videos and articles are available for free at davidsteinfeld.com.

The Law Office of David Steinfeld –

E-mail: info@davidsteinfeld.com

Tel: (561) 316-7905.

What does the logo of the Law Office of David Steinfeld mean?

Often times I am asked what the trademarked logo for the Law Office of David Steinfeld signifies.  It has two simple components; a courthouse and a large lowercase “e” with computer code for “electronic”.  The courthouse is obvious.  The “e” represents that fact that my practice is all digital and heavily involved with new and emerging issues in business litigation, like electronic discovery.

As a business lawyer that counsels and represents businesses and their owners, I recognize that it is critical to move at the speed of these businesses and to not slow them down.  Most businesses now almost exclusively use e-mail and store their records digitally.  Most law firms do not and are not set up to work with businesses so as not to significantly disrupt their operations.  I cannot image telling a business client nowadays to print thousands of e-mails so I can manually review them in a lawsuit.  The time to do that and the cost of the paper and ink is totally unnecessary when they can easily and securely upload data to an e-discovery vendor and have me log in remotely to use the sophisticated e-discovery software to cull and review those.  Business litigation is all about costs.  If the businesses’ lawyer can reduce those costs, then the process can be more efficient and affordable.

Discovery is the process by which parties to a civil lawsuit obtain and exchange information before trial.  E-Discovery is the term given to doing this process electronically using sophisticated software.  In addition to performing e-discovery regularly, I also teach lawyers and even Judges how to properly and ethically do e-discovery.  Because there are a multitude of vendors that provide e-discovery software, the question that often arises from lawyers is how to choose the right one.  For that, I have created a “consumer reports” type website to assist lawyers nationwide in choosing the right software for their cases called e-discoverysoftwarereviews.com.  Through understanding this new e-discovery process and staying current on its trends and developments, the Law Office of David Steinfeld can provide the best and most efficient representation to its clients.

But what business wants to be involved in an expensive and time-consuming lawsuit if they can avoid it?  That is where the planning and counseling aspect of my practice comes in.  For those business people who recognize the importance of avoiding problems before they occur, I advise them on and draft important business documents, such as contracts, operating and shareholder agreements, non-competes, non-disclosures, and the purchase and sale of a business or its assets. I have also created and placed a significant number of free videos and articles on my Firm’s website, http://www.thepalmbeachbusinesslawyer.com, that explain these legal issues that businesses commonly face and provide basic background information on them.

steinfeld

The Law Office of David Steinfeld’s videos and articles are designed to help the business owner to understand the parts of a lawsuits and what documents they should have for their business.  This also saves the client time and money in that I don’t always have to explain these issues in such great detail because the client already has an understanding of the legal vocabulary and concepts from watching those videos or reading the brief articles.  I have even crafted a series of articles about key areas commonly encountered in business lawsuits, such as what are interrogatories and what happens at mediation, which clients can read to save the time and cost of me explaining it.  Any way that I can save my business clients money makes the process more efficient and affordable for them.

My practice also uses a large amount of technology to service clients, so business people do not even have to leave their office to work with me.  Simple technologies like video chat and screen sharing allow my Firm to service clients virtually any time and worldwide.  For example, while teaching American law in South Korea, I was able to design and craft all the business documents for a growing South Florida personal injury law firm that allowed it to efficiently expand Statewide.

Although my Firm is based in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, I regularly counsel and represent businesses and individual clients all over Palm Beach County from Jupiter to Boca Raton, across the State of Florida and all over the United States, Europe and Asia when they have business dealings in the State of Florida.  I am licensed to practice before all Courts in Florida from trial Courts up to the Florida Supreme Court, and all Federal Courts in Florida, including Bankruptcy Courts, the Federal Appeals Court that covers Florida, and even the United States Supreme Court.  Even though I may not regularly practice in all of these Courts, I maintain these licenses because a business client in Palm Beach County and I may sue in the local State Court and the other side may remove the case to Federal Court and change the venue to the Northern District of Florida, which may then later be appealed to the Federal Appellate Court in Atlanta or even the US Supreme Court.  I would do a disservice if I was unable to counsel and represent my client through that entire process, which to me is what a business should expect of its business lawyer.

About the Author

Board Certified expert in business litigation by the Florida Bar, David Steinfeld, Esq. is the owner of the Law Office of David Steinfeld in Palm Beach Gardens.  He is AV-Preeminent rated by Martindale-Hubbell, 10.0-Superb rated by AVVO, named one of Florida’s Legal Elite for 2012 and 2013, highlighted as “One to Watch” for 2014 by Attorney-at-Law Magazine, selected for inclusion in the list of Florida Super Lawyers for 2014, and recognized as one of the top business lawyers in Florida for 2013 and 2014 by The Legal Network.

Mr. Steinfeld sits on the Florida Bar Board Certification Committee for business litigation and is the current Chair of the Palm Beach County Bar’s Business Litigation CLE Committee.  He was also appointed by the Florida Supreme Court to its Committee on Business and Contract Jury Instructions and is a member of the Association of Certified E-Discovery Specialists.  He is an invited Fellow in the national trial lawyer honor society, the Litigation Counsel of America, and is a full Professor of Law at Dankook University Law School in South, Korea.  Informative videos and articles are available for free at davidsteinfeld.com.

The Law Office of David Steinfeld – E-mail: info@davidsteinfeld.com

Tel: (561) 316-7905.

So Your Business Is Moving – What Do You Need To Do?

First off, congratulations.  A move or change is usually positive or results in something positive in business.  So you, the business owner, have decided to change locations or expand to a different one.  Whether your business is sales or service related, you still want to consult with your business lawyer for things like discussing liabilities of transport, storage of assets, and a review of your new lease, preferably before you sign it.

A lease is obviously one of the significant documents that any business owner will sign.  A good time to have counsel review that new, proposed lease is when you are taking an inventory of physical property and exploring your options for transporting your business assets to the new location.  In other words, early in the process and before you move in.

But why?  Why not just sign it, move in, and deal with it later?  That leasing agent looked trustworthy enough . . . what could go wrong, right?!  As the owner of the business, large or small, you have a legal and fiduciary duty to act in and for the best interest of that business.  However, even beyond that, it is just prudent and smart business to avoid problems later by confirming or negotiating issues now.

Not all commercial leases are created equal.  I’ve seen leases generated by shopping center owners that are large nation-wide companies that use the same lease in all fifty States.  Guess what, Florida law is different than some of those, therefore, what is accepted there may be illegal here, like self-help.  One of the biggest issues in Florida is HVAC.  A business without air conditioning can quickly find itself out of business.  Who is responsible for the HVAC at your business location and what does that new lease say about it?

Recently, a client of mine was looking at new commercial space.  The lease made the HVAC the tenant’s responsibility.  I recommended that my client have the HVAC professionally examined and low and behold we find out it is almost 20 years old, hasn’t been maintained, and probably has less than a year’s life left on it.  A new business like that can ill afford a $15,000 or more bill to replace the HVAC in year one; now my client can move in worry free with a new HVAC system from the landlord and even agree to take on the responsibility of maintaining it because the cost of so doing for a new system is very low.  Problem avoided, less to worry about, money saved, and small legal fee expense of business well spent as opposed to larger expenses later.

In sum, the best time to consult with your business lawyer is before you execute any move and lease.  Each situation is unique, but the mind of the business lawyer looks at aspects that the business owner may not consider.  The small expense of the consultation to the business will be worth the peace of mind and protection later.

About the Author

Board Certified expert in business litigation by the Florida Bar, David Steinfeld, Esq. is the owner of the Law Office of David Steinfeld in Palm Beach Gardens – davidsteinfeld.com.  He is AV-Preeminent rated by Martindale-Hubbell, 10.0-Superb rated by AVVO, named one of Florida’s Legal Elite for 2012 and 2013, highlighted as “One to Watch” for 2014 by Attorney-at-Law Magazine, and recognized as one of the top business lawyers in Florida for 2013 and 2014 by The Legal Network and selected for inclusion in the list of Florida Super Lawyers for 2014.

Mr. Steinfeld sits on the Florida Bar Board Certification Committee for business litigation and is the current Chair of the Palm Beach County Bar’s Business Litigation CLE Committee.  He was also appointed by the Florida Supreme Court to its Committee on Business and Contract Jury Instructions and is a member of the Association of Certified E-Discovery Specialists.  He is an invited Fellow in the Litigation Counsel of America and a full Professor of Law at Dankook University Law School in South, Korea.  Informative videos and articles are available for free at davidsteinfeld.com.

The Law Office of David Steinfeld – E-mail: info@davidsteinfeld.com

Tel: (561) 316-7905.

Or visit us online at http://davidsteinfeld.com